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Lets congratulate Princess Mycia Cox, fellow nanoscale PhD student, for defending her Ph.D. dissertation, entitled: "Design and fabrication of low loss and low index optical metamaterials" last week. She completed the work under the supervision of Dr. Michael Fiddy (Electrical and Computer Engineering).

 

 

Mycia 22"Meta-materials" is an highly active area of research at UNC Charlotte. The researchers are specially interested in making materials which have their index of refraction close to zero or negative. Mycia's talk  was focused on making and studying these type of low index and preferably low loss materials -particularly at optical frequencies. Its also important that we make these materials through low cost processes   in order to make them in large enough quantities. Given these considerations, nanomaterials especially metallic or semiconductor nanocrystals fit the criteria .In mycia's case ,she fabricated and studied aluminium doped zinc-oxide nanoparticles. Her work was also supplemented by extensive simulations  and modeling. A large number of students including fellow nano students and...

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Department of Chemistry, University of South Florida

“LIGHTING-UP METAL ORGANIC FRAMEWORKS: PHOTOCATALYTIC GUEST ENCAPSULATION IN METAL ORGANIC FRAMEWORKS”

Metal organic frameworks (MOFs) have emerged as an important class of porous materials noted for extremely high surface areas, functionalizable building blocks, and ease of synthesis. To date, a plethora of MOFs have now been synthesized and their physical properties examined with a focus on gas storage and separation. The catalytic diversity of MOFs, on the other hand, is emerging as an important area of MOF functionality with photo-catalysis a primary target of investigation. Two general strategies have been employed in the development of MOFs as photo-catalysts. The first utilizes the metal cluster building blocks and/or the ligands composing the framework as the photo-active component of the MOF. These photo-active framework MOFs typically contain lanthanide metal clusters or porphyrin based organic linkers which are both photo-chemically active. Alternatively, recent advances have been made in the development of MOFs in which the ligands connecting the metal clusters are composed of either free base or metallo-porphyrins. The advantages of this type of MOF photo-catalyst include a high density of available catalytic sites, ease of access of photochemical reactants and the ability to tune the framework to be selective...

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Department of Physics and Astronomy,Kinard Laboratory Building,Clemson University

“IMPROVING THE PHYSICS AND SPEED OF DELPHI POISSON-BOLTZMANN SOLVER”

​Emil AlexovElectrostatic forces and energies are one of the major components of the total energy of biological macromolecules. However, computing the electrostatic field distribution in systems made of biological objects immersed in water is not trivial task because of the large degree of freedom associated with the water phase, which in general limits the applications of explicit model to system with sizes smaller than several hundred Angstroms. This problem is avoided by applying continuum electrostatic approaches to deliver the potential distribution, considering that the water and macromolecules are two distinctive dielectric media. Here we report development and implementation in DelPhi of a Gaussian model for atomic densities and its usage to deliver a smooth dielectric function. The performance of the Gaussian DelPhi was benchmarked against solvation energies of small molecules obtained with explicit water simulations and very good agreement was found. The Gaussian DelPhi was also shown to perform much better than standard calculations in delivering the potential distribution is the...

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Nanoscale Science - Faculty in Focus

Research in our group focuses on the design, and synthesis of novel hybrid inorganic-organic materials for a wide variety of applications, predominantly in biomedicine, renewable energy, and catalysis. Our approach is multidisciplinary, interfacing chemistry, biology, and material science. By its very nature our research will provide an excellent training environment for undergraduates, graduate students and postdoctoral research fellows.